CAREGUIDE  |  9 MIN READ

Redesigning the Nanny Lane landing pages to increase conversions & reduce bounce rate

Photos of the landing web pages for the Nanny Lane brand displayed side by side with a laptop

Role

  • Product Designer

Project Type

  • Launched Redesign

Tools Used

  • Figma

Team

  • Shannon - Director of Nanny Lane
  • Roman - Principal Engineer

Duration

  • Nov 2019 – Jan 2020 (3 months)
BACKGROUND

Proposing a redesign of our landing pages as a growth opportunity

During my time at CareGuide, I was leading the design efforts on the Nanny Lane product. Nanny Lane is a web application that connects caregivers to families seeking long or short term care for their children. Using our tools and resources, families can find caregivers and caregivers can find work with ease.

Nanny Lane has seen exponential growth often through SEO and SEM, finding new users coming from search platforms. We wanted to increase our 11% conversion rate on our main landing pages, so going into Q4 2019 I proposed a redesign of our landing pages to increase conversions, reduce our bounce rate, and effectively sell the Nanny Lane brand.

Business Objectives

🎯
What were we trying to achieve?
📌
Convert 275 new users
📌
Increase conversion rate by 10%
📌
Reduce bounce rate by 10%

User Goals

👥
What are our users trying to achieve?
📌
Find a solution that assists them in finding a nanny
📌
Use a trustworthy and secure platform to connect with nannies near them

Constraints

What restrictions did I have to consider?
📌
Existing brand guidelines
📌
Responsiveness
📌
SEO keywords

Responsibilities

What was I responsible for?
📌
Redesigning our three main landing pages to increase conversions and reduce bounce rate
📌
Leading design efforts (sketching, wireframing, visual design, illustrations, etc...)
📌
Copywriting
THE PROBLEM

The existing landing pages were not effectively portraying our product’s value, lacked in securing our users’ trust, and needed to be optimized for conversions.

DISCOVERY

Figuring out the problem started with research and evaluating our existing designs

Shannon (Director of Nanny Lane) took the responsibility of collecting the user research and quantitative data needed to address some of our assumptions. That research led to the creation of our problem statement above which guided our approach to the redesign.

While the research was being done, I focused on evaluating the design of the existing landing pages. Taking a closer look at the visual hierarchy, copywriting, visual layout and more, I was able to get a better idea of where we could make improvements. While doing so, I took some quick notes with ideas, thoughts, and action items to look back on during the ideation phase.

First impressions  👉

If this is the first thing our users see, how do we best capture their attention?

📌
Eye-catching imagery
📌
Copy tailored to their needs
📌
Clear call to action
How does it work?  👉

Is this an accurate representation of what users can expect from signing up?

📌
Research examples of the nanny hiring process
📌
Reconsider the steps based on research
📌
Simplify copy and illustrations
What services do we offer?  👉

Are we communicating our services in a way that resonates with our users’ needs/goals?

📌
Review how users interact with this section of the page
📌
Ensure these services are accurately portraying value
ORIGINAL DESIGN
Screenshot of the original Nanny Lane landing page layout
👈   What is Nanny Lane?

Is this the best way to define our value? Is this definition clear to our audience?

📌
Revisit the definition
📌
Explore our target audience’s communication style
👈   Introducing “Nanny Shares”

With this being a fairly new concept, how might we better sell the concept of nanny shares?

📌
Simplify the definition
📌
Use visuals to attract attention
ORIGINAL DESIGN
Screenshot of the original Nanny Lane hero section
First impressions  👆

If this is the first thing our users see, how do we best capture their attention?

📌
Eye-catching imagery
📌
Copy tailored to their needs
📌
Clear call to action
Screenshot of the original Nanny Lane what we do section explaining what the company does
What is Nanny Lane?  👆

Is this the best way to define our value? Is this definition clear to our audience?

📌
Revisit the definition
📌
Explore our target audience’s communication style
Screenshot of the original Nanny Lane how it works section explaining how the product works step by step
How does it work?  👆

Is this an accurate representation of what users can expect from signing up?

📌
Research examples of the nanny hiring process
📌
Reconsider the steps based on research
📌
Simplify copy and illustrations
Screenshot of the original Nanny Lane nanny share section explaining nanny sharing
Introducing “Nanny Shares”  👆

With this being a fairly new concept, how might we better sell the concept of nanny shares?

📌
Simplify the definition
📌
Use visuals to attract attention
Screenshot of the original Nanny Lane additional services section explaining what the additional services the company offers are
What services do we offer?  👆

Are we communicating our services in a way that resonates with our users’ needs/goals?

📌
Review how users interact with this section of the page
📌
Ensure these services are accurately portraying value
RESEARCH FINDINGS

Reconnecting to share our findings and prioritize accordingly

Although I wasn’t directly responsible for this part of the project, I wanted to include a summary of the conclusions shared from the research conducted by our product manager.

These findings helped us set our problem statement and figure out what to prioritize from a design perspective.

What did we learn?

💡

The landing pages don’t portray a sense of security or credibility due to a lack of brand awareness

Our call to actions are confusing, often being clicked but not leading to the acquisition of new users

The services we offer aren’t providing value to potential users, with a majority of them skipping over this section

SKETCHES

Finding creative ways to explore different page layouts and collaborate

I started this project by sketching out my ideas on separate pieces of paper and cutting that paper into sections. I wanted to visualize different layout options and figure out what order of sections would feel the most natural.

As a team, we mixed and matched the order of the sketches I provided. We landed on the order displayed here, introducing new sections along with existing ones.

Hero
Sketch of the hero section on a website with a title, description, and button
How It Works
Sketch of a section on a website explaining how the service and product work in a step by step format
Social Proof Option #1
Sketch of a section on a website where companies are featured
Nanny Share & Testimonial Section
Sketch of a section on a website where the nanny share concept is explained along with a testimonial
Social Proof Option #2
Sketch of a section on a website with text that reads "serving 150,000 nannies and families"
Additional Services
Sketch of a section on a website explaining the additional services provided
Final Call to Action
Sketch of a section on a website where one would provide text and a call to action button
Footer
Sketch of a section on a website where the footer would be, holding links to other pages on the website
WIREFRAMES

Moving forward with our sections, considering content, and iterating further

After that mini workshop, I moved forward with low fidelity wireframes. At this point, I was starting to consider how content might change what each section looked like and the order we displayed it in. We often found ourselves jumping between brainstorming content and designing to accurately visualize our ideas.

It was in these brainstorming sessions that I also introduced sections to the page that weren't in the original design:

🆕  Benefits Section

Highlight key benefits and how Nanny Lane can add value to our potential users

🆕  Testimonial Section

Use testimonials to build trust and credibility with those who are undecided

🆕  Final CTA Section

Wrap up the flow of sections with a final call to action

Below you’ll find where we left off with the wireframes before moving into a higher fidelity stage. If you're interested, feel free to look through the previous iterations to see how the design evolved as we went through our feedback sessions.

Hero Section
Final iteration wireframe of the hero section
How It Works Section
Final iteration wireframe of the how it works section
Additional Services Section
Final iteration wireframe of the additional services section

Previous iterations (4)

triangle arrow icon
Previous iteration wireframe of the additional services sectionPrevious iteration wireframe of the additional services sectionPrevious iteration wireframe of the additional services sectionPrevious iteration wireframe of the additional services section
KEY CONSIDERATIONS

Laying the foundation to scale our product

As the sole product designer, it was my responsibility to make design decisions that not only solved the problem at hand but considered the future of the product. One of our goals with this redesign was to make changes that would allow us to scale the company and product at a faster pace. I knew that the decisions we made for this redesign would serve as the foundation for how we would approach design across the rest of the app.

The landing pages served as the starting point for majority of these changes. Some of the things we wanted to reconsider were how we approached the use of illustrations and images, our brand tone of voice, typography and spacing.

ILLUSTRATIONS & IMAGES

Telling a story through visual metaphors and imagery

The visuals used on the original landing page relied heavily on selling the product features. With the redesign, I wanted to focus on using illustrations as visual metaphors.

I also incorporated images into the design beyond just the hero section. We found that people were more receptive to seeing photos as they told a story beyond what we could with just words.

Illustration of three profile cards and a magnifying glassIllustration of a profile card and signed contract with a pen and stars
Illustration of a telescopeIllustration of a growing plant with two branchesIllustration of a heart floating over a hand cupped under it
TONE OF VOICE

Finding Nanny Lane's voice... again!

The original brand guidelines had outlined that it was important to write in a manner that is clear, concise, accessible, and trustworthy. While the intention was there, the original design focused heavily on being concise which led to a lack of emphasis on the other principles.

So, we spent a lot of time making sure we were consistent with our communication style. We kept to the original guidelines but also wanted to write in a way that would make our audience feel supported.

Screenshot of the new how it works section from the redesigned Nanny Lane page highlighting the tone of voice updatesScreenshot of the new how it works section from the redesigned Nanny Lane page highlighting the tone of voice updates
TYPOGRAPHY

Embracing sentence case in our copywriting

We experienced some challenges trying to adapt our tone of voice to our existing type styles. Majority of the page used all caps text which didn't translate appropriately with our updated tone of voice. Some major changes were made to how we styled our typography by removing the use of all caps and using a sentence case approach to writing.

This challenge brought light to a much bigger problem we had with our type system in general regarding contrast, visual hierarchy, and more. You can read more about how we approached that problem in this case study.

START YOUR JOURNEY TOWARDS FINDING YOUR PERFECT NANNY
incorrect icon
Start your journey towards finding your perfect nanny
correct icon
SPACING

Learning to embrace restrictions and adapt

The spacing system that was used in the app consisted of the following pixel values: 4, 8, 16, 32, 64, and 128.

I felt quite limited at first only being able to use a fraction of the values I was used to using. However, I didn't want to fall into a habit of changing things when they didn’t work in my favour. Realistically, I find that behaviour defeats the purpose of systems as a whole.

Instead, I learned to adapt my designs to this system and we found it sped the developer handoff process immensely.

Screenshot of the new benefits section from the redesigned Nanny Lane page highlighting the spacing requirements with red indicators
FINAL DESIGN

Launching our new landing page(s)

Our plan for launching this redesign was broken up into stages. When this design was completed we were set to hand off and launch the home page by the end of Q4. We discussed A/B testing first but found that we didn't have a large enough user base to do so.

Instead, we launched the main landing page first while I worked on the redesign of the nanny and nanny share landing pages. We planned on evaluating post-launch how successful we were and use our findings to decide how we'd approach launching the other two pages.

Screenshot of the redesigned Nanny Lane landing page
THE RESULTS

Breaking records, surpassing our objectives, and celebrating a successful launch

The redesign was successfully launched in Q1 2020. Our main objective was to drive continuous Nanny Lane growth. The launch directly aligned with our key result of converting 275 new users, along with our conversion and bounce rate objectives.

How did we do?

Vector with the number +16% wrapped in a circle
Conversion rate increased

The new redesign saw an increase in conversion rate by 16% with 90% of users converting in the hero section.

Bounce rate reduced

We hit a record new low for bounce rate with a reduction of 8%, bringing it down to an average of 15-17%.

Vector with the number +7.4% wrapped in a circle
Average session duration increased

Our changes also increased average session duration by 7.4%, an unintentional win amongst other successes.

We took a risk not A/B testing some of the new changes we made, but in the end we were happy to see our hard work paid off. The redesign made a huge positive impact on our quarterly objective for new user sign ups, exceeding it well beyond 100%!

The success of this redesign gave the green light for the launch of the other two landing pages. A lot of the UI used on our home page was re-used and adapted to the needs of these pages, making it possible for Roman (Principal Engineer) to develop each of them in just one day!

These other pages were launched closer to when I was no longer at the company, so I didn't get a chance to do a post-launch review of how these pages did in comparison.

KEY LEARNINGS

Reflecting on my process, the project outcome, and how I’ve grown in this role

This was one of the first major projects I launched during my time at Nanny Lane. I transitioned into my role at Nanny Lane from an internship I completed at eCompliance. During my internship, I was lucky to have an experienced designer to lean on when I wasn't confident making higher level decisions.

Moving into this new role, it was my responsibility to adapt to a new environment with new found responsibilities. This project brought new opportunities for growth, not only as a designer but also as a leader and collaborator.

What went well...

Led the project from concept to launch

Taking an idea and seeing it through is no easy task. There were a lot of project management related tasks that I did behind the scenes to guide the team successfully through the project from beginning to end.

Delivered developer handoffs seamlessly

Majority of the sections were made to be reused across all pages. By taking a component-based approach to this design, we were able to build and launch our landing pages faster.

Created a shared understanding of copywriting & typography

Leading a lot of the conversations around copywriting and typography, I was able to help my team understand the importance of content and how it plays an integral role in design.

What I’d do differently...

Conduct more testing before launch

There were many ideas that we didn’t pursue due to a fear of the unknown. With more time and resources, I would’ve liked to A/B test different solutions to make more informed design decisions.

Be more involved in the research process

Being in a small team, it’s hard to be involved in everything. While it wasn’t necessary for me to lead the research process, I believe if I had been more involved I would’ve had a stronger understanding of our users.

Ready for more? ✨

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